A skill for the 21st Century: computational thinking in African schools

At the recent Innovation Africa conference, many African educational ministries were talking about ‘readying’ their learners for the 4th Industrial Revolution and developing 21st Century Skills to advance their economies. These skills are an undefined issue, which many education ministries are attempting to solve through providing digital content and devices in the hope that these skills are acquired as a side effect of technology usage. In Botswana, the MOBE initiated a pilot of digital devices and content, with Microsoft and partners, to foster these skills. In Zimbabwe, a new curriculum is rolling out with a subject Internet Communication Technology, including basic digital literacy as well as sections on digital citizenship and coding skills. The recent curriculum reform in Ghana sees a strong focus on ICT-integration as well as a new subject Computing, which covers ICT (operating a computer, word processing, databases, etc.) as well as internet skills. Nigeria is a tech-aspirational market with a keen interest in internet technology and the entrepreneurial opportunities it offers. In South Africa, the message around the 4th Industrial Revolution is consistently reiterated through government as well as party political communication channels as well as ongoing communication from the Department of Basic Education

South African Coding and Robotics Curriculum

The South African government is developing curricula for coding and robotics for grades R to 9, in order, according to the basic education minister, Angie Motshekga, to create sustainable industrialisation and keep pace with the world.

Computation thinking in South Africa – driven by coding and robotics

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Teaching phonics in Nigeria

For the past few years I have been working (for Cambridge University Press) on the development of print and digital material for the Nigerian schools’ market. With a large and competitive schooling system, this has proven a challenging and engaging experience. In order to differentiate ourselves from our competitors we have tried a number of strategies. One of the more successful ones so far has been the development of an integrated digital phonics course, provided with our print English textbooks. Phonics are already included in the NERDC English curriculum and covered by the teacher in the classroom, but with many Nigerians second or third language English-speakers, correct pronunciation is highly valued.

But first, what is phonics?

Phonics is used to teach reading through the development of a child’s phonemic understanding. The aim of teaching phonics is for a learner to associate the smallest unit of sound (or phoneme) with the corresponding spelling patterns they represent. Learners will eventually be able to decode new words by sounding them out. It is a very successful approach to teaching reading and pronunciation, used in schools globally. 

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CUP South Africa partners with NGO Worldreader

Interviewed for an article in The Bookseller magazine about a mobile learning project I initiated with Cambridge University Press and the NGO Worldreader.

Article below and source here http://www.thebookseller.com/news/cup-south-africa-partners-ngo-worldreader

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