Pressbooks – a user review

Let me paint you a picture of book production in the 21st Century – in most cases, it’s very similar to book production in the 20th Century. Cambridge, for example, still uses a linear workflow where the editor works on the manuscript and then, once ready, passes it on to the typesetter to lay the book out. A series of back and forths then ensure between typesetter and editor, who marks up a PDF with corrections and changes for the typesetter to implement. Once the editor and publisher are happy with the product, the typesetter produces a print-ready PDF, and your book is published. Oh wait, you wanted an e-book as well. Let’s start a whole new process where we convert the print PDF to epub, with an added round of checking and proof-reading to see that the conversion process didn’t drop any content (it happens!). Now you want to edit or change something? Let’s go back to the editor and typesetter to fix this and back to the digital producer to make the change in the e-book. It’s (very) exhausting.

Which is why I was so excited to test out O’Reilly Media’s online publishing platform a few years back, developed in-house and used to manage their book production. The platform had a dashboard where you could create a new project and import a manuscript, stored in a database. The editor and author would both have accounts on the platform and could work simultaneously on the document. While editing, changes are saved in real-time, with a record of all changes kept. The editor can reverse these changes if needed. Any images could be uploaded directly to the platform and inserted in the book. The book designer (in this case, someone with web technology skills) would design a template for the book using CSS. This CSS would have options for the print version of the book as well as the e-book. At the end of the process, a printable PDF or epub file would be exported, for printing and distribution. If there were any changes needed, the editor could log into the platform, make the edit and export the files could quickly and easily. For me, this seemed like an ideal workflow for book production. Unfortunately, Cambridge, like other traditional publishers, has legacy systems in place, and the effort to switch over to this type of platform was more than the perceived benefit. This experience did, however, get me excited about alternative ways of producing a book and I set about exploring some of them, one of which is Pressbooks.

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